Posts Tagged ‘T-Post Trellis’

T-Post Squash Trellis Follow Up

Thursday, August 13th, 2015
Squash Trellises

Squash Trellises

I posted on June 28th just after I set up a trellis system using concrete reinforcing grids and T-posts. Here is the post.

I’m happy to report that the trellis has so far exceeded my expectations. The plants have climbed well over the top of the 7 foot high trellis. They remain healthy and have set good looking fruit much of which is almost full size. Barring a catastrophic collapse due to disease or insects (always a possibility, but hopefully unlikely), we are going to get an excellent harvest of butternut, buttercup, acorn, sweet dumpling and several other smaller winter squash this fall. The un-trellised larger squash are also looking good, as are the melons, and we can barely keep up with the zucchini and summer squash. So far so good.

Melon and Squash Trellises Using T-Post and Metal Concrete Reinforcing Grid

Sunday, June 28th, 2015
Melon Trellises

Melon Trellises

Squash Trellises

Squash Trellises

I planted smaller squash and melons without a firm idea on how I was going to trellis them.   Going online, I found several references to using metal concrete reinforcing grids as trellis material.  I knew immediately this was a good solution that would easily integrate with my T-posts, which I use for most of my trellis frames.

Remesh Screen

Remesh Screen

I found the grids at Home Depot where they are referred to as Remesh Sheets.  They are less than $8.00 each for a 42 inch by 84 inch grid made up of a fairly heavy wire laid out in 6” x 6” squares.  The quality of the sheets in the store varied and all were rusty, even though stored inside.   I had to pick though the stack to pull out nice flat ones with no breaks in the wire.

Jute Tie Down

Jute Tie Down

The trellises were very easy to set up.  After laying out my tentative spacing, I just pounded in the first T-post and laced in the grid using jute twine.  I used some spring clamps to hold the grid in place while I laced the grid to the post.  Using the untied edge of the grid as a guide, I pounded in the next T-post, clamped the first and second grid to the new post and laced them in together.  From this point, it’s just a matter moving down the line with as many grids as you want to use.  It’s a very simple process.

Vertical Posts Allow Reach In Space

Vertical Posts Allow Reach In Space

Several of the online setups I looked at used wood posts for framing set up as a sloped A-frame.  I think the T-posts, being vertical will allow for easier weeding and harvesting with enough space to get to both sides of the grid easily.  The T-posts are also easier to work with than wood.

7 foot grids on 6 foot posts

7 foot grids on 6 foot posts

My T-posts are 90” long driven in about 18”, so six feet above ground.  The mesh is seven feet leaving about a foot of unsupported grid.  I think the wire will be strong enough to hold anything that climbs up that tall without folding.  We’ll see.

Interplanting Trellised Peas in Open Raised Beds

Sunday, April 5th, 2015
Open Raised Bed

Open Raised Bed

Open raised beds lend themselves well to home vegetable growing. A trellised pea planting demonstrates their versatility.

I try to cover my beds with leaves in the fall. The leaves protect the beds during the hard freeze, slow down weed production, and make it easier to get into the garden early in the spring. This picture shows the leaves raked off and any weeds that did sneak through pulled out. I use the leftover leaves as mulch in the paths or I just sweep them into an adjacent bed as I open up the garden. I don’t work the leaves directly into the bed soil. That’s too much work and I think would probably make the soil too acidic as opposed to just letting the leaves break down in the paths.

T-Post Trellis for Peas

T-Post Trellis for Peas

I’ve added about 20 gallons of compost to my 20 foot long bed. I’ve scraped up some soil from the adjacent paths and raked and smoothed up the bed to give it some height. The trellis system uses T-posts spaced 3 feet apart and 21” between the rows. The trellis lattice is two foot wide fencing cut to 60″ lengths, laced crosswise between the posts with jute. The T-posts are 90” long with about 70” above ground.

Peas Interplanted with Greens in Open Raised Bed

Peas Interplanted with Greens in Open Raised Bed

Here is the bed with the trellising in place and completely planted. Peas are planted on 2” centers along both sides of the fencing. In between each trellis of peas I’ve planted two rows of greens of various types including collards, spinach, lettuces, radishes and chard. The outside slopes are planted with a dense seeding of cilantro and mustard from saved seed. At both ends of the bed I’ve laid down about a 4” wide strip of marigold seed, saved from last year’s flowers.

I interplant peas like this each year, but this is my most ambitious and structured planting so far.  I’m pretty sure I’ll be happy with the results.