Posts Tagged ‘Squash Trellis’

Trellised Squash Harvest

Monday, September 28th, 2015
Trellised Squash

Trellised Squash

We harvested about 40 small winter squash yesterday. They were trellised using T-posts and concrete reinforcing grid. The trellis is discussed here.

The advantage of trellising is space saving. These squash only took up about 60 square feet of garden space, grown in one 10 foot raised bed.

Harvest of Smaller Squash

Harvest of Smaller Squash

The big Australian Butter Squash in the back of the picture did fine, but it was really too big for the trellis. It should have been trailing along the ground with the Hubbard’s, large pumpkins and the monster Boston Marrow that we’ll be harvesting in the next couple days.

T-Post Squash Trellis Follow Up

Thursday, August 13th, 2015
Squash Trellises

Squash Trellises

I posted on June 28th just after I set up a trellis system using concrete reinforcing grids and T-posts. Here is the post.

I’m happy to report that the trellis has so far exceeded my expectations. The plants have climbed well over the top of the 7 foot high trellis. They remain healthy and have set good looking fruit much of which is almost full size. Barring a catastrophic collapse due to disease or insects (always a possibility, but hopefully unlikely), we are going to get an excellent harvest of butternut, buttercup, acorn, sweet dumpling and several other smaller winter squash this fall. The un-trellised larger squash are also looking good, as are the melons, and we can barely keep up with the zucchini and summer squash. So far so good.

Melon and Squash Trellises Using T-Post and Metal Concrete Reinforcing Grid

Sunday, June 28th, 2015
Melon Trellises

Melon Trellises

Squash Trellises

Squash Trellises

I planted smaller squash and melons without a firm idea on how I was going to trellis them.   Going online, I found several references to using metal concrete reinforcing grids as trellis material.  I knew immediately this was a good solution that would easily integrate with my T-posts, which I use for most of my trellis frames.

Remesh Screen

Remesh Screen

I found the grids at Home Depot where they are referred to as Remesh Sheets.  They are less than $8.00 each for a 42 inch by 84 inch grid made up of a fairly heavy wire laid out in 6” x 6” squares.  The quality of the sheets in the store varied and all were rusty, even though stored inside.   I had to pick though the stack to pull out nice flat ones with no breaks in the wire.

Jute Tie Down

Jute Tie Down

The trellises were very easy to set up.  After laying out my tentative spacing, I just pounded in the first T-post and laced in the grid using jute twine.  I used some spring clamps to hold the grid in place while I laced the grid to the post.  Using the untied edge of the grid as a guide, I pounded in the next T-post, clamped the first and second grid to the new post and laced them in together.  From this point, it’s just a matter moving down the line with as many grids as you want to use.  It’s a very simple process.

Vertical Posts Allow Reach In Space

Vertical Posts Allow Reach In Space

Several of the online setups I looked at used wood posts for framing set up as a sloped A-frame.  I think the T-posts, being vertical will allow for easier weeding and harvesting with enough space to get to both sides of the grid easily.  The T-posts are also easier to work with than wood.

7 foot grids on 6 foot posts

7 foot grids on 6 foot posts

My T-posts are 90” long driven in about 18”, so six feet above ground.  The mesh is seven feet leaving about a foot of unsupported grid.  I think the wire will be strong enough to hold anything that climbs up that tall without folding.  We’ll see.