T-Posts in Trellises

T-Post Trellises

T-Post Trellises

Intensive gardening in open raised beds practically demands working with a lot of trellises.  The system of concentrated planting doesn’t lend itself to sprawl, and the solution is to grow vertically.   I stake or trellis many plants to get maximum production in limited space and to keep the aisle spaces passable.

I use T-posts as my main trellis component.  They are cheap, strong, and last forever.  And they lend themselves well to various designs. Most of my T-posts are 7’ 6” long.  I’ve found the 90” length adaptable to many trellises.  The post is tall, but not so tall I can’t work with them easily.  T-Posts normally come in lengths from about 3 feet to 12 feet.  I do have some smaller ones I use for other tasks, but I like the 90” post for most of my trellises.

Here are three different trellis structures using the same T-post for the frame.

Squash / Melon Trellis

Squash / Melon Trellis

Lacing Melon Through the Grid

Lacing Melon Through the Grid

Squash and melons:  This trellis uses concrete reinforcing grids.  The grids are 42” x 84” and are readily available at building supply stores.  I place one grid vertically between two posts and use jute twine to tie everything together.

Pea Trellis

Pea Trellis

Peas:  This trellis uses 24” landscape fence tied between posts set 3 feet apart.  The trellis makes it easy to get a lot of peas into one bed and it also puts the peas up and easy to reach from both sides of the trellis.

T-Post and Bamboo Tomato Trellis

T-Post and Bamboo Tomato Trellis

Tomato Trellis - 2

Tomato Trellis – 2

Tying off Tomato Stems.

Tying off Tomato Stems.

Tomatoes:   T-posts provide framework for the bamboo stakes and also act as a tomato stake to the adjacent plants.

Guardian of the Garden

Guardian of the Garden

T-post trellises fill a need in my quest for both a practical and sustainable garden.

 

 

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2 Responses to “T-Posts in Trellises”

  1. Val says:

    How deeply embedded are your bamboo stakes? Do you reposition t-posts yearly? They must require a ladder to install unless you are a giant! In rocky soil t-stakes are not indestructible…Do you put 2layers of 24″ fence horizontally or run them vertically. I could not tell from photo. Seems like a substantial investment in hardware. Without many years of service, you would need a great harvest!

  2. Noel says:

    The bamboo is barely into the soil, maybe an inch, but it’s all laced together with a superstructure above giving it some rigidity. I re-position yearly. I have to because of crop rotation. I don’t use a ladder but in the last few years I’ve taken to using a step-stool, although I could drive the posts without one. In my clayey glacial till, some of my posts are almost 30 years old and doing fine. I run the 24″ fence vertically between the posts. The posts are less than $5.00 each and I’ve been using them since the late 1980’s, buying a few each year to get to my present collection. But I haven’t had to buy any for a long time, so the annual cost of the investment is pretty small.

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