Posts Tagged ‘judy valdes’

Garlic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015
Mulched Brussels Sprouts

Mulched Brussels Sprouts

We still have Brussels sprouts growing in the garden. They can tolerate light freezes and even colder temperatures if covered with straw or leaves – which we have done. Most years I pick the sprouts before it gets super cold, then blanch and freeze them. This year the freezer was already at capacity so that was not an option.

Lately I’ve been roasting the sprouts. There are lots of variations on the theme but basically the vegetables are tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper and roasted in a 400 degree oven until “done”. I use “done” loosely because your version of done may be different than mine. Timing can be anywhere from 20 minutes to 45 minutes, depending upon the size of the sprouts and your definition of done. Some people like them just barely cooked and some like them browned and crispy.  Use some caution, overcooking can make them mushy inside.

Sprouts on Parchment

Sprouts on Parchment

Recipe:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

1-2 pounds Brussels sprouts

2-4 T. olive oil

1 clove squeezed garlic mashed with 1/4 – 1/2 tsp. salt or to taste

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Clean and trim Brussels sprouts. If they are very large you may want to cut them in half or cut an X in the stem end. Mix garlic/salt mixture with olive oil and toss with the sprouts. Grind pepper over all. Place on a greased broiler pan or use parchment paper. Bake until just done or until browned and crispy – your choice! The sprouts pictured were small, about the size of a nickel, and were roasted for 25 minutes.

We served them with a red wine/tamari seared portobello mushroom, buttered potatoes and pureed Red Kuri squash. Yum!

Portobello Harvest Dinner

Portobello Harvest Dinner

Fermented Cabbage the Kraut Source Way

Monday, November 2nd, 2015
Sauerkraut Fermenting

Sauerkraut Fermenting

Above is a picture of the purple sauerkraut I started a couple of days ago with cabbage, ginger, dill and hot pepper.

We had about ten  cabbages of four different varieties in this year’s garden.  Since we don’t have a great way to store them fresh for any length of time I went on a fermentation binge.

Three years ago when I made my first successful ferment I wrote about the method used here.

While that’s a perfectly fine method I was introduced to Kraut Source by an e-mail note from my daughter – she knows where my interests lay!  They ‘kraut sourced’ their new ‘gizmo’ and I was intrigued.  It has a spring-action top to keep the veggies submerged below the liquid and a moat ‘water filled’ top with a loose cone-shaped cover so the ferment burps itself.  The only thing you need to do while the fermentation is doing its thing is to keep the moat filled with water which keeps the air out.

Here’s a picture of the three quarts I made a couple of weeks ago – fermented for ten days.  From left to right:  Dilly Kraut with Carrots, Purple Kraut with Apples, Raisins & Cinnamon and Kraut with Onion, Cilantro, Ginger, Cumin Seeds & Hot Pepper

Three Quarts of Finished Kraut

Three Quarts of Finished Kraut

Ferments can be done in as little as 4-5 days depending on how sour you like your kraut.  Salt quantity can vary according to your taste.  I used 2 teaspoons per quart.

The heat process involved in canning sauerkraut destroys the bacteria and probiotics that help digestion.  We just refrigerate it when we deem it done.

Snow Pea Mushroom Tofu Stir Fry

Thursday, June 18th, 2015
Snow Pea Mushroom Tofu Stir Fry

Snow Pea Mushroom Tofu Stir Fry

Pea pods or snow peas are in – just in time to take over the green aspect in the kitchen from the dwindling asparagus patch. The young and tender pods are great eaten right off the vine. They’re good raw and also make a crunchy addition to a stir fry as long as you don’t overcook them.

Here’s what I came up with for dinner a couple of nights ago:

 Snow Pea Mushroom Tofu Stir Fry Recipe

2 T. olive oil or your favorite stir fry oil

1/2 cup raw almonds (or walnuts or cashews)

1 small sliced onion

1/2 pound tofu, diced

1 T. nutritional yeast

1 cup crimini mushrooms, sliced

2 cups pea pods

1 cup veggie broth

3 T. tamari

2 T. arrowroot or cornstarch

1/2 tsp. maple syrup or sugar

Preheat wok or cast iron frying pan to medium high. Add 1 T. oil and add nuts, stirring constantly for 45 seconds to 1 minute until browned but not burned. Remove nuts from pan and set aside. Add onions to pan, stir for 1 minute and remove from pan. Add the other tablespoon of oil to pan. Add tofu and stir fry for 2 minutes until it starts to brown. Sprinkle in the nutritional yeast and brown for another 2 minutes, stirring constantly.

Add the onions back to the pan along with mushrooms, pea pods and veggie broth. Cover and cook for 2 minutes. Mix tamari, arrowroot and maple syrup in a small cup until thoroughly combined. Stir into veggies for about a minute to thicken the juice. Sprinkle the almonds on top and serve over rice.  We had black forbidden rice which has a nice nutty flavor and texture to complement the vegetables.

Sautéed Almonds

Sautéed Almonds

Sautéed Onions

Sautéed Onions

Sautéed Tofu

Sautéed Tofu

Fresh Crimini Mushrooms

Fresh Crimini Mushrooms

Fresh Snow Peas

Fresh Snow Peas

Veggie Broth

Veggie Broth

Arrowroot, Tamari Sauce and Maple Syrup

Arrowroot, Tamari Sauce and Maple Syrup

Radish and Pea Pod Sauté

Friday, June 12th, 2015
Radish and Pea Pod Sauté

Radish and Pea Pod Sauté

With the abundance of radishes in the garden this year I’m trying something new. We’ve always eaten our radishes raw, right out of the garden, or sliced in our salads. I had heard of cooking radishes but never tried it myself. Noel keeps bringing in radish thinnings (some not so thin) from the plantings used as row markers for the carrots, beets and turnips. The first handful of pea pods were a beautiful and vigorous snow pea called Giant Swiss that we bought from the folks at Fruition Seeds while we were walking the Chicago Flower Show this past March.

Peas and radishes hitting the kitchen at the same time turned on the light bulb and a new dish, at least for us, came about.

Here’s my recipe that serves 2 people:

2-3 t. olive oil

1 cup quartered radishes, if small just halve them

1 cup pea pods

2-3 t. water

Salt and Pepper to taste

Pat of butter, optional

Sautéing Radishes

Sautéing Radishes

Preheat cast iron frying pan to medium heat. Add oil and radishes and sauté for about 4 minutes. Add pea pods and water, cover and cook for 2 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and a little bit of butter for extra flavor, if desired. The cooked radishes have a mellower flavor – a little like turnips – without the raw radish bite. The dish was interesting and tasty – something we will put in our repertoire!

Radishes and Peas in the Pan

Radishes and Peas in the Pan

Giant Swiss Snow Pea

Giant Swiss Snow Pea

Radish Thinnings

Radish Thinnings

Sautéed Mustard Greens

Monday, June 8th, 2015
Mustard in the Pea Patch

Mustard in the Pea Patch

Noel has mustard greens growing like weeds in the garden.   He planted the mustard along with various lettuces at the edges of the pea patch and also interspersed them with the garlic plants. Some of what doesn’t get eaten will go to flower to attract pollinators and generate more seeds for future crops. Honey bees love the mustard flowers, and so do a wide variety of other pollinators. Any mustard plant that gets in the way of our pea and garlic crops will be pulled like a weed and used to feed the compost pile.

Lots and Lots of Mustard

Lots and Lots of Mustard

Mustard in the Garlic

Mustard in the Garlic

We use the baby greens in our salad mix and the bigger leaves in a stir fry or side dish as in the recipe below.

Mustard and Onions in the Skillet

Mustard and Onions in the Skillet

Sautéed Mustard Greens

1 T. olive oil

1 onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

8 cups chopped mustard greens

1 T. seasoned rice vinegar

Preheat cast iron frying pan to medium. Add olive oil and onions. Sauté for 2-3 minutes, then stir in garlic. Immediately stir in mustard greens and toss until coated with oil. Mix in vinegar, turn to low heat and cover for about 5 minutes, or long enough to steam and soften the greens.

There are lots of ways to flavor the greens but the seasoned vinegar seems to balance the slight bitterness or zestiness of the mustard. Sprinkle with freshly ground pepper and enjoy as a side dish.

Almost Ready to Serve

Almost Ready to Serve

Asparagus Mushroom Tofu Scramble

Thursday, June 4th, 2015
Breakfast Scramble

Breakfast Scramble

A couple of days ago Noel brought in shiitake mushrooms from our logs at the side of the woods. I had a handful of fresh picked asparagus, some tofu leftover from a stir fry and a few cremini mushrooms in the fridge. Here’s what I came up with for a very satisfying breakfast.

Asparagus Mushroom Tofu Scramble

1/2 pound asparagus, sliced in 1-inch pieces

1/4 pound mixed sliced mushrooms – I used shiitake and cremini mushrooms

1/2 pound diced tofu

1/4 cup chopped onion

1-2 cloves minced garlic

1-2 T. olive oil

1 T. nutritional yeast

1/2 tsp. turmeric

1/4 tsp ground cumin

1 T. Tamari

1 T. Water

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat cast iron pan to medium, then add olive oil. Sauté onions for a minute, then add garlic and cook for another 30 seconds. Add mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes before adding the asparagus. Cook covered for about 5 minutes. Add tofu and stir for a few more minutes until tofu is a little browned. Mix in the nutritional yeast, turmeric, ground cumin and pepper. Combine Tamari and water, add to the pan and mix well, scraping up any bits that have stuck to the pan.   Check for seasoning and add more Tamari if you wish. Enjoy with toast and your favorite side of fruit.

Scramble Ingredients

Scramble Ingredients

Vegetarian French Onion Soup

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015
Crusted Onion Soup

Crusted Onion Soup

Spring is here and so are the sprouting onions. It’s time to clean out the larder or keep a close eye on it. We had a fantastic onion harvest last year and still have lots of onions but they do tend to start growing again when spring hits. The yellow onions keep better so I wanted to use up the red onions before they got too soft, with more sprout than onion.

I had just over 3 pounds of reds left which was just about the perfect amount for a batch of onion soup. I adapted the following recipe from a Vegetarian Times recipe. I used a white wine that I had on hand (instead of the sherry as originally called for) in the soup. It was quite tasty, but I thought it needed a little deeper flavor so the next time I plan to make it with dry red wine & Tamari instead of broth or salt.  Your personal taste preferences count for a successful meal – just use the recipe as a guide and choose your own seasonings.

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

1 Tbs. Olive oil

5 large red onions (about 3 lb.) halved and thinly sliced

3 cloves garlic, minced or about 1 Tbs.

1/2 tsp. salt

2 Tbs. unbleached flour

6 cups of your favorite vegetable broth or 6 cups water and 2-4 T. Tamari Sauce to taste

1/3 cup wine (dry sherry, dry white or dry red wine)

1 tsp. Dijon or stone-ground mustard

1 tsp. rice vinegar or other mild vinegar

Toasted whole grain bread – 1 piece for each serving

2/3 cup shredded Gruyère cheese or your favorite white cheese

Sautéing Onions in the CobraHead Test Kitchen

Sautéing Onions

  1. Heat butter and oil in heavy, large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, garlic and salt, and cook 5 minutes, stirring often. Reduce heat to very low, and cook, stirring occasionally, 50 to 60 minutes, until onions are very tender and brown.
  2. Stir in flour, and cook 3 to 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Blend in broth, wine and mustard. Cover, and simmer 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in vinegar.
  3. Preheat broiler. Ladle soup into heatproof bowls. Top each with slice of toast and grated cheese. Broil until cheese is bubbly and golden, about 1 to 2 minutes. (Ours got a little black around the edges but it was still good.) Serve hot.
Ready for Broiling

Ready for Broiling

Mashed Potato Salmon Pie

Thursday, February 12th, 2015
Mashed Potatoes and Salmon Pie

Mashed Potatoes and Salmon Pie

Last week I wanted a “stick to your ribs” meal for dinner. I had potatoes and salmon on the brain so I went searching on the internet for a recipe with those ingredients. I found a salmon and potato casserole recipe that looked interesting, so I gave it a try. While it was very tasty we thought it was on the dry side.   So here’s my version that we liked a whole lot better.

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients:

15 oz canned pink salmon, drained, skin and bones removed, and separated into chunks

2 1/2 pounds potatoes, cut in 1″ pieces – I used unpeeled Colorado Rose potatoes (from the garden)

1 cup milk, warmed – I used soy milk that I had on hand

4 ounces shredded cheese – I used a mix of Monterey Jack & Swiss – whatever you have on hand

3 T. parmesan cheese, grated

2 large eggs, beaten

2 T. butter

4 oz. Neufchatel cheese

1/2 cup finely chopped red onion (from the garden)

salt and pepper to taste

  1. Grease a 10″ diameter pie pan.
  2. Cook potato chunks in boiling salted water until tender – about 20 minutes and drain.
  3. Using a large bowl mash the potatoes along with the warmed milk, shredded cheese, 1 Tbls. parmesan cheese, butter and Neufchatel cheese. I left it a little chunky.
  4. Stir in the salmon and onions and check for seasoning.
  5. Stir in the 2 beaten eggs and mix well.
  6. Place in prepared pie pan and sprinkle with remaining parmesan cheese.
  7. Bake at 375 degrees for about 35 minutes, until heated through.

Serve with a nice big salad and you’re good to go! Also makes great leftovers. The chilled baked mixture slices very nicely. Cut into 3/4″ slabs and pan fry in a little olive oil preheated on medium high for about 4 minutes (2 minutes on each side) until heated through. Serve for breakfast with some fried eggs or serve with sliced apple and celery sticks for a quick lunch.

Potato Rösti Stuffed with Fontina Cheese, Onions and Mushrooms

Monday, December 1st, 2014
Rösti in the pan

Rösti in the pan

Potato Rösti was on the dinner table last night. We had this dish for the first time almost 30 years ago right after we moved to Wisconsin. Noel’s Swiss boss took us to the New Glarus Hotel Restaurant in the village of New Glarus, WI – Wisconsin’s Little Switzerland. There are many versions of rösti but this one is my adaptation of a recipe given to us by our dear friends, Michael and Linda.

Recipe:

2 lbs. potatoes (I used Colorado Rose potatoes from the garden)

1 cup shredded Fontina cheese

1 onion, thinly sliced (red or white)

1 cup sliced cremini mushrooms

Seasoned salt

4 T. Olive Oil, divided

2 T. Butter

½ tsp. salt, or to taste

Early in the morning or the day before, simmer the potatoes in their skins until barely cooked or slightly underdone – do not overcook. Drain the water and chill the potatoes in the refrigerator for at least an hour or overnight. When ready to make the rösti peel the potatoes and shred. Toss with 1 T. olive oil, ½ tsp. salt, divide mixture into two portions and set aside.

Using 1 T. olive oil sauté the sliced onion for 5 minutes then add the mushrooms and cook for another 5 minutes. Sprinkle with seasoned salt to taste and set this mixture aside.

When ready to cook the rösti preheat a 10” cast iron pan to medium low. Add 2 T. olive oil and 2 T. butter, making sure to swirl the grease up the sides of the pan. After butter is melted add one half of the shredded potatoes and press down evenly in the pan. Spread the cheese over the top of the potatoes followed by the onion mushroom mix. Add the second half of the shredded potatoes and again press down evenly. Run the spatula around the edge to shape the cake and pull the potatoes away from the edge of the pan. This will make it easier to remove from the pan when ready to turn it. Do not stir the potatoes, you want them to stick together.

Rösti Filling

Rösti Filling

Fry the first side for 20 minutes, adjusting the heat if necessary, so it doesn’t burn. Loosen the potatoes and place a large plate over the top of the frying pan. Using hot mitts flip the pan onto the plate. If you’re lucky the rösti will come out in one piece. Slide the cake gently back into the pan and cook for another 20 minutes. Use a little more oil if necessary. I didn’t need to, the pan looked slippery enough as it was.

Cut into wedges and serve from the pan or slide it onto a plate before cutting. Although making rösti is time consuming it’s well worth it because it’s unbelievably delicious.

Colorado Rose Potatoes

Colorado Rose Potatoes

Garlicky Rose Finn Potatoes

Saturday, November 8th, 2014
Frying Rose Finn Potatoes

Frying Rose Finn Potatoes

We love garlic. Noel plants over 100 cloves each year so we have lots of garlic to use all year. I don’t think a day goes by that we don’t eat some form of garlic and/or onions.

I got the idea for this recipe from making a vinaigrette, which starts with a smashed clove of garlic mixed with salt. I love the taste of raw garlic. Garlic gets sweeter when it’s cooked and if you’re not careful when sautéing, it can burn easily and get bitter.

The Rose Finn fingerling potatoes are narrow in diameter, usually around 1”, but they can be smaller or larger. This recipe works well when serving 2-3 people. Just scrub up a few potatoes and cut into ¼” slices to make 2-3 cups, or enough for a single layer to fit in your 10” or 12” frying pan. Preheat your pan to medium heat and pour in a layer of olive oil. Add the potatoes and fry for 10-15 minutes, turning once or twice, until browned and cooked through.

While the potatoes are frying, squeeze 1-2 cloves of garlic into a large mixing bowl and mix with ¼ teaspoon of salt. When potatoes are crispy, drain and toss into bowl with the prepared garlic paste. Mix thoroughly and EAT! If cooking for more than 2 or 3 people just roast your potatoes in a hot (425 degree oven) for 25-35 minutes and toss with a larger amount of garlic paste. Great for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Rose Finn Fingerling Potatoes

Rose Finn Fingerling Potatoes