Archive for February, 2017

Stir Fried Vegetables Over Somali Bantu Rice

Monday, February 27th, 2017
Stir Fry Over Rice

Stir Fry Over Rice

Stir fries are a good way to use up small amounts of various veggies.  If you add some tofu or other protein it’s a very satisfying meal.

Here’s what I came up with this time.

8 oz tofu, cubed

2 dried shiitake mushrooms

1 cup water

1 T. Tamari

Simmer the above ingredients and drain, reserving the liquid.  Chop the mushrooms (discarding the harder stems,  and set the tofu mushroom mix aside.

Stir Fried Tofu and Veggies

Stir Fried Tofu and Veggies

2 T. Olive Oil

1 T. fresh ginger, minced

1 T. garlic, minced

1 medium onion, sliced

5 stalks bok choy, stems sliced and separated from the greens

1 cup cauliflower, chopped or sliced

1 cup red cabbage, sliced **

1/4 cup sherry

2 T. tamari

1 T. arrowroot

Heat olive oil over medium heat.  Sauté ginger and garlic for 30 seconds, then add onion and cook for 2-3 minutes until softened.  Add bok choy stems, cauliflower and red cabbage along with reserved liquid (and enough water to make 1 cup) from the tofu mushroom mix.  Cover and simmer for 3 minutes.  Add bok choy greens, cover and simmer for 2 more minutes.  Mix sherry, tamari and arrowroot together until there are no lumps.  Mix into vegetables and stir for 1 minute until thickened and liquid looks clear.

Serve over your favorite rice.  I cooked Himalayan Red Rice in the Somali Bantu style – recipe.  The red rice does take 50-55 minutes to cook.  If you start the rice first, by the time you get your ingredients ready and chop up all your veggies the rice will be almost finished when you’re ready to stir fry.  It’s just a matter of prioritizing what needs to be done first.

**If you do use red cabbage be aware that any leftovers will be purple the next day, especially the tofu!

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetarian Shepherd’s Pie

Sunday, February 26th, 2017
Veggie Shepherd's Pie

Veggie Shepherd’s Pie

“It is a homely thing in one or another sense of the word, depending on your point of views.”  Glyn Lloyd-Hughes, Description of Shepherd’s Pie:  The Foods of England

I should perhaps title this recipe Shepherdess Pie which apparently is a variation made without meat but I hadn’t heard the term before I started looking at recipes.  Shepherd’s Pie was traditionally made with minced lamb and Cottage Pie was made with minced beef.

It’s easy enough to make and even easier if you have leftover mashed potatoes, gravy and vegetables.

Recipe:

Veggies in the Steamer

Veggies in the Steamer

6 cups steamed vegetables of your choice (part or all leftover veggies)  I used bok choy, cauliflower, carrots, collard greens, onions and threw in some frozen green beans at the last minute.

4-6 cups mashed potatoes  (either leftover or made with 2 1/2 to 3 pounds potatoes)

Shallots and Mushrooms

Shallots and Mushrooms

2 cups gravy or sauce of your choice   (this may be leftover gravy or fresh mushroom gravy-see recipe )    If you prefer you could use a tomato or cheese sauce instead of traditional gravy.

Oil a deep dish pie plate or casserole dish.  Mix veggies and gravy and scrape into pie plate.  Place mashed potatoes on top to cover filling all the way to the edge of the dish.

Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 45 minutes until gravy is bubbling.  Timing will depend upon the temperature of the ingredients when placed in the oven.  If all ingredients are freshly cooked and warm it will take about 25 minutes.  If they are leftovers and cold from the fridge it will take longer to heat through.  Enjoy!

Pie on a Plate

Pie on a Plate

Waiting for a Handout

Waiting for a Handout

Wood Garden Flats

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Wood Flat

This old flat dates back to about 1990.  I started making my own flats from some cheap fence wood I had acquired.  I’m not sure where I got the design, probably a garden magazine or garden book, but it has proven to be long-lasting and very useful.  The flats are built using  3″ x 12″ x 5/8″ wood for the ends and 3″ x 18″ x 5/8″ wood for the sides.  Thus they are 3 inches deep.  The construction is very rough, especially the older ones, which were cut with a hand saw.  Now I use a table saw and the newer flats are definitely squarer.

Flat Lined with Newspaper

I line the flats with newspaper. They can be filled with soil, or filled with seed starting cups or pots.

Flat Filled With Potting Soil

When I fill the flat with soil, I use a block of wood to level out the soil and tamp it down.

28 Seed Cups in Flat

The flats hold 28 small 5 ounce drink cups exactly.  I start most of my seeds in these small cups.

Stackable Flats

The flats are stackable and strong.  Unlike many plastic seed starting trays, they are ridged and less likely to be upset when moving them around.  I now have about 30 of these flats in my collection.  They are easily repairable.  Wood flats are an important part of my gardening routine.