Archive for November, 2014

Garlicky Rose Finn Potatoes

Saturday, November 8th, 2014
Frying Rose Finn Potatoes

Frying Rose Finn Potatoes

We love garlic. Noel plants over 100 cloves each year so we have lots of garlic to use all year. I don’t think a day goes by that we don’t eat some form of garlic and/or onions.

I got the idea for this recipe from making a vinaigrette, which starts with a smashed clove of garlic mixed with salt. I love the taste of raw garlic. Garlic gets sweeter when it’s cooked and if you’re not careful when sautéing, it can burn easily and get bitter.

The Rose Finn fingerling potatoes are narrow in diameter, usually around 1”, but they can be smaller or larger. This recipe works well when serving 2-3 people. Just scrub up a few potatoes and cut into ¼” slices to make 2-3 cups, or enough for a single layer to fit in your 10” or 12” frying pan. Preheat your pan to medium heat and pour in a layer of olive oil. Add the potatoes and fry for 10-15 minutes, turning once or twice, until browned and cooked through.

While the potatoes are frying, squeeze 1-2 cloves of garlic into a large mixing bowl and mix with ¼ teaspoon of salt. When potatoes are crispy, drain and toss into bowl with the prepared garlic paste. Mix thoroughly and EAT! If cooking for more than 2 or 3 people just roast your potatoes in a hot (425 degree oven) for 25-35 minutes and toss with a larger amount of garlic paste. Great for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Rose Finn Fingerling Potatoes

Rose Finn Fingerling Potatoes

Garlic Planting in Fall in Wisconsin

Monday, November 3rd, 2014
Ridged Bed for Garlic Planting

Ridged Bed for Garlic Planting

I try to plant garlic in late October. This year we were a day late and the garlic went into the ground on the first of November. I had previously prepared the bed so all I had to do was soften the soil a little and with a steel rake make three relatively equal ridges running the length of the beds. The garlic was shoved into the top of the ridges until it was just covered. I also scattered a lot of lettuce seeds, salads greens and cilantro along all the slopes and valleys. These will sprout in the spring and fill the bed with greens. Essentially, I’ll get two crops out of one bed.

Garlic Bed Paths Mulched with Leaves

Garlic Bed Paths Mulched with Leaves

After I had the bed planted, I raked in a tarp full of leaves and mulched all the paths around the bed.

Straw Protects the Garlic Through the Winter

Straw Protects the Garlic Through the Winter

I finished the job by scattering a small square bale of straw over the ridges. The straw will protect the garlic from hard freezes.  When all goes well, the garlic will be poking its leaves up as the snow melts. And as I rake back the straw and leaves, we’ll start getting lettuces and greens for early spring salads.

I’ve been using this method for quite a few years. It works very well. Here are earlier references: Garlic 2010    Interplanting Garlic with Greens