Archive for June, 2013

Baked Sweet Potatoes and Asparagus Stir Fry

Thursday, June 6th, 2013
Sweet Potato, Asparagus Stir Fry, Garden Salad

Sweet Potato, Asparagus Stir Fry, Garden Salad

We still have asparagus coming up and lots of volunteer salad greens.  While it’s great to have the greens they don’t quite fill you up by themselves.  But wait, there’s more . . . sweet potatoes from the 2012 fall harvest.  We still have half our last year’s harvest left.  They keep for a long, long time, if properly cured and stored.

I baked 4 large sweet potatoes at 400 degrees for an hour, until easily pierced with a fork.  For our meal, the two of us only needed one split in half.  The other three are chilling in the refrigerator for a salad or whatever pops up for a meal in the future.

In addition to the buttered sweet potato, we made a lettuce salad topped with blue cheese chunks, onions, and a homemade white wine garlic vinaigrette.   The meal was rounded out  by an asparagus, onion, and shiitake sauté seasoned with a bit of tamari sauce.

The meal was outstanding . . . all the freshness of spring, anchored with a very substantial sweet potato.  Life is good!

 

Hurray for the Volunteers!

Sunday, June 2nd, 2013

Volunteer Salad Greens

Volunteer Salad Greens

 We’re getting lots of volunteer lettuces and other salad greens this year.  I’m transplanting some to the pea bed and elsewhere, but most we are just harvesting the whole plant where they are growing.

I talked about letting salad greens bolt and go to seed in a post last September: http://blog.cobrahead.com/2012/09/10/simple-seed-saving/

In addition to some lettuce seed which I saved and scattered  throughout the garlic bed, a lot of the seed has sprouted in and around where the plants were growing last year.

Greens Transplanted Into the Pea Bed

Greens Transplanted Into the Pea Bed

I’m moving many of them to the pea bed.  The lettuce really does well sheltered by the peas.

Volunteer Lettuce Ready to Harvest

Volunteer Lettuce Ready to Harvest

We’re just harvesting little clumps like this for immediate consumption.

Volunteers are free and I’m making them and saved seed an integral part of my garden.